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Daniel Watson, ChFC,CLU,RHU
   

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The newsletter articles on this page provide valuable information on timely and interesting financial issues across a variety of subject areas, including retirement, investments, personal finance, annuities, insurance, taxes, college, and government benefits.


 

How do the economic milestones of young adults today compare with prior generations?

If you're the parent of a young adult who is still living at home, you might be wondering whether this situation is commonplace. According to a recent U.S. Census Bureau study, it is: One in three young people (ages 18 to 34) lived in their parents' home in 2015.

The Census Bureau study examines how the economic and demographic characteristics of young adults have changed from 1975 to 2016. In 1975, for example, less than one-fourth of young adults (ages 25 to 34) had a college degree. Young adults in 2016 are better educated — more than one-third hold a college degree (or higher) — but student loan debt has made it more difficult for them to obtain financial stability, let alone establish homes of their own in their 20s.

More young adults in 2016 had full-time jobs than their counterparts did in 1975. In particular, young women ages 25 to 34 are experiencing economic gains, with more than two-thirds in the workforce compared with less than half in 1975. Young women today are also earning more money than they did in 1975 — their median incomes have grown from nearly $23,000 in 1975 to more than $29,000 in 2016 (in 2015 dollars).

Despite the educational and economic advances that young adults have made over the last 40 years, many are postponing traditional adult milestones. In fact, a majority of young adults are not living independently of their parents. Of the 8.4 million 25- to 34-year-olds still living at home, one in four are not attending school or working. It's important to note, though, that this could be because they are caring for a family member or have health issues or a disability.

Compared to 40 years ago, the timing and accomplishment of milestones on the path to adulthood are much more diverse and complex today. To view the full report, visit census.gov.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, "The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975-2016," April 2017
 
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IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES
Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc.,Member FINRA,SIPC and Registered Investment Adviser, PO Box 64284, St. Paul,MN.  55164-0284

Insurance services offered by Daniel Watson Agency, Inc., which is not affiliated with Woodbury Financial Services, Inc.

Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, or legal advice. The information presented here is not specific to any individual's personal circumstances.

To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, it is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.



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